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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
appalling to hear a dialogue that talks about using religion to discriminate against both myself and my community. you know, when i was in high sdoo school, i was actually assaulted because i was gay. as a result, i spent most of my life down playing the fact. you know, i don't ride in pride parades and i don't really wear it on my cuff, but i really feel compelled to really put it out there. you know, i don't think that we deserve a bill like this anywhere in this country. >> joining me now, damian klinko, the arizona state representative you just heard from and washington post columnist jonathan capehart. what made you speak about the bill the way you did, using your own personal reference, which as you said is not something that you are inclined to do. >> i used my own story because this is a personal attack against me and everyone in the lgbt community in the state of arizona. the community doesn't deserve this sort of treatment. and i don't think there's ever an excuse that we should sanction discrimination against a minority group. it makes me sad and disappointed in a state that
, politics played a part in arizona's battle of religion, discrimination and pay rights, but big businessmen may have really tipped the scales. >>> join the club! seriously, clubs for young job seekers. plus google glass, wearable art for tech, i'm david shuster in for ali velshi, this is "real money." this is "real money" and you are the most important part of show so join our live conversations for the next half our on twitt twitter,@aj realmoney. >>> five states have similar scaled religious predom bills before their legislatures like the law vetoed in arizona. about the potential economic consequences of moving forward, already there are 18 states including arizona with laws chmed by religious freedom activists that mirror a federal law protecting a person's right to exercise his religion. but the legislation in arizona would have gone further, let owners of businesses refuse service, against gays and other marginalized groups. think muslims and mormons. jan brewer said her legislation went too far. but business big interests like chamber of commerce and companies called marriott, americ
for businesses to discriminate against lbgt people. it was pushed by people who fear that the freedom of religion is under attack. but she pushed back saying there were no instances in arizona of religious freedom taking a backseat to lbgt right. >> senate bill 1062 does not address a specific concern related to religious liberty in arizona. i have not heard of one example in arizona where business owners' religious liberty has been violated. >> the thing is, arizona is not an outlier here anymore. at least 12 other states are looking at similar bills. oregon could even see something on its ballot this year. several of these efforts have run into roadblocks, sure, or even political abandonment following the outcry in arizona. but it is, we think, all part of a larger strategy on the right, invoking religion as a trump card in venues where there was actually a consensus that other, shall we say, nonreligious values rule. i'm thinking about like profits in the corporate board room or science in the public hospital. and where arizona's effort failed spectacularly, a more careful interpretation and v
a bill that would allow businesses to refuse services to gays and lesbian by invoking religion. jan brewer vetoed the bill. but cecilia vega reports it will not stop a nationwide debate. >> reporter: it was the arizona bill that ignited a national firestorm. >> nobody rides in the back of the bus and everybody sits at the lunch counter. we fought that battle once. that's what this battle is. >> reporter: with polls showing a public shift on gay rights. a majority of americans now support same-sex marriage. the pressure for arizona governor jan brewer to veto the bill was fierce. major american companies came out swinging, calling arizona's law bad for business. in the end, brewer vetoed the bill. >> religious liberty is a core american and arizona value. so is non-discrimination. >> reporter: this as some of the most conservative states have become the new battle ground in the same-sex marriage war. a federal judge striking down texas' ban. so-called religious freedom laws like the one so fiercely debated in arizona, now seen as yet another weapon in the fight by supporters of the b
's right to exercise his religion. but the legislation in arizona would have gone further, let owners of businesses refuse service, against gays and other marginalized groups. think muslims and mormons. jan brewer said her legislation went too far. but business big interests like chamber of commerce and companies called marriott, american airlines, apple and petsmart. in 1994 the national football league moved the super bowl out of arizona when it refused to make martin luther king a national holiday in their state. this week, the nfl threatened to take next year's super bowl out of the grand canyon state again. the next battle ground appears to be georgia where lawmakers are considering legislation similar to arizona's already big business is must mustering. sexual orientation are never mentioned in these bills. atlanta-based american airlines, say, mutual respect and dignity, the 165 million customers we serve every year. delta strongly post office these measures and we join the business community and urging state officials reject these proposals. for more, we go to stephanie stanto
in georgia yes two bills with religion our liberty in their titles and were seen as a way to possibly discriminate against gay men and lesbian, go down in that. also in another conservative state. we are seeing a tidal wave on this issue that i think will be hard for people to resist in just about any corner of it. >> yeah, you put it that way. that's extraordinary, coming from how long you've been covering these state and national issues. jackie, when you look at the legal issues here which as we've said we're -- which combined with the political legislature, and then something else, jackie, which is the fact that these issues are being covered differently, i think, and not covered always on the sometimes conservative terms of calling it religious liberty. a lot of people support religious liberty, but they don't think that means it should be a cover for discrimination. >> well, yeah, i think one of the things that's been interesting, particularly with the republican party is the strain of libertarianism that's been infused recently, which is another reason why i think you see some r
of legislation. tell me how this is tied to, and maybe differs from arizona's freedom of religion laws. >> that is an interesting question, how did arizona get to this moment? i wish we could speak to that, but where would we begin. the freedom of religion law passed in 1999 and existed at the federal lovel level in 1993. we inserted a line in this newest incarnation of the bill that talks specifically about a belief being sincerely held. that's where people are getting hung up and feeling like everybody feels that their beliefs are sincerely held. that is language added to this bill, and some say it clarifies. >> say the governor signs this piece of legislation into law, and businesses turn away gays and lesbians lead to go discrimination lawsuits. would it be up to a judge to determine the sincerity of a business ow owner's religious convictions? >> reporter: in arizona the state does not prohibit gay or lesbian. in three of our largest cities they are. in that case the city would have to bring case against the individual business owner. so a person, i, couldn't bring a lawsuit again
, regardless of their religion or sexual orientation in the united states. that's not the case in so many other countries and so this year's human rights report catalogs those kinds of abuses if someone is part of what's considered a minority group for this country or that. it is a very comprehensive document, tony. >> and roz, according to the state department who are did worst offenders of violating human rights laws? >> they don't rank countries per se, but what they do instead is point out what they consider the more egregious violations of human rights. such was the case on thursday when the report was released, about the way people were treated inside syria. if they are supporting the political opposition that wants to replace bashar al-assad they are targeted. if they live in communities where people are opposed to be government where people also happen to live they are targeted as well. the report made a point of saying the u.s. was using both chemical weapons as well as traditional weapons into not opposing the government, they said this is just beyond the pale in terms of the way the
's exercise of religion without showing compelling government interest. the orange states are states that if passed rfra-like provisions by court decision. you can see that in the wall street journal if you want to learn more about that. we are skipping with our colors. renÉe is waiting in california. good morning. caller: i wanted to correct one thing here. iticus that talks about man laying down with man. you guys get the views from the homosexual side but you also need to get the other side here. i don't believe in same-sex marriage. i hate the fact that people always want to compare homosexuality with racial. that has nothing to do with it. it is a lifestyle that they choose. i am an a store and christian, i should not be forced to make a cake for two women or two men. that is my right. the thing about it is, god will in the end.al say his were never changes. it is all the same. it was a sin before and it's a sin now. god does not hate the sinner, he hates the sin. you worry about the example of the wedding cake. that example also brought up in today's washington post in their l
exercise of religion, sincerely held religious beliefs. >> opponents of the bill claimed victory for an open attack on gays. >> this showed the nation that not all arizonians are like extremists, and that there are good people, and we want to lead the country forward, not backwards. >> a statement was issued, praising her decision. >> major corporations weighed in too. apple, american airlines, delta and the n.f.l. all urged governor jan brewer to veto the measure. >> it was a combination. business community and activist. >> it sent a message to the governor. >> and speaking of the business community, supporters of the bill have been saying that there is a lot of support by local businesses. one of our producers here made several calls, 50 businesses, dry cleaners, hair salons, and could not find a local business behind it. >> thank you. we should point out the veto of the bill in arizona does not end the debate open over religious freedom nationwide. it got further, being a signature away from the governor to become war. similar balls failed to pass in kansas, idaho, south dakot
of speech, freedom of religion, and freedom of the press. and they go to the other side of the world, leaving behind everything they love -- family, friends, neighbors, and the wonders of america -- to fight for our country. and they deserve our thoughts, prayers, and support. and i'm here to give them all three. >> so, what exactly do you do for our troops and veterans? >> change 4 georgia is a non-profit organization that assists our troops overseas by providing them with items that fit in their backpacks, add comfort, and are not readily available -- items like beef jerky, ramen noodles -- a favorite -- and crackers. we also provide the veterans and their families here at home with diapers, new and gently used clothing, food, and personal items. and we offer scholarships to student veterans at local colleges for their extraordinary efforts in going above and beyond the call of duty. >> was it hard to get started? what were some of the biggest challenges? >> our two biggest challenges were finding volunteers and finding veteran families in need, because the veteran families may be
of the largest cities including hiking on saturday and would be governed by the new religion in the capital. like i was making a living even though i need a ukranian. get your money. all i can do with how to tackle rising market i went to sam have had their hands on. the new country failed to prevent relief we don't want such a country we want our country to peace. we used to work and pay taxes thank you. what started as a peaceful rally turned violent when pro russian activists cost with no was named to the authorities in kenya with tear gas report abuse as well as books in stakes. more than a hundred were injured as protesters managed to gain control of the administration building and even replace the ukrainian flag with the russian one. before saturday the ministry sell the hunter region building was protected by the so called self defense. off mike down now it is secured by the police forces and is still great deal of uncertainty as to who actually holds the power here other cities in the east and southeast again sitting at the critical hogan's oh so she'll be distrusted the new government wh
allowed business owners to refuse to serve gays by citing their religion beliefs. here is what the governor said just minutes ago. >> after weighing all the arguments i have vetoed senate bill 1062 moments ago. to the supporters of this legislation i want you to know that i understand that long held norms about marriage and family are being challenged as never before. our society is undergoing many dramatic changes. however, i sincerely believe that senate bill 1062 has the potential to create more problems than it purports to solve. i could divide in arizona in ways we could never imagine and no one would ever want. religious liberty is a core, american and arizona value. so is nondiscrimination. going forward, let's turn the ugliness of the debate over senate bill 1062 into a renewed search for greater respect and understanding among all arizonans and americans. >> many people owned this bill because -- opposed this bill because they believe it provided political will to discriminate. brian rooney explains. >> protest was loud, where the legislature once again they said made
is pouring rights to religion out the window. host: what do you mean? caller: the bill is for private individuals to have their own -- that have their own business to serve whatever customer they want to serve. i think that's the law anyway. universal law. they should be able to do that. nobody should be against that. not like telling somebody else how to run their own business because you're a consumer. host: what about the issue of discriminating on the basis of race. are you opening the door to allow that? based on religious views? >> no. because i think that's a person's thing, how your skin is is how you're born. how you choose to conduct yourself, that's something you choose. host: from florida. >> i want to -- caller: i want to bring up a point, the people that are discriminating and oppressing others are always going to cry that they are being oppressed and discriminated against when ople seek to end the discrimination and oppression that they are performing. did that make sense to you? host: appreciate you chiming in with your thoughts. here are the thoughts of senator john m
religion has the most force. the courts are like the worst place in order to try to get a religious belief codified or encoded into law. because the way in which the supreme court. >> you have to have a secular purpose for the law. when religious right was on the offense, what it did was to use a ballot initiative. everyone goes into the voting booth and votes their religious convictions. you can't second guess that. now that those statutes have become to be struck down by the courts, giving us secular reasons. now that they're playing defense, what the religious right is doing is saying, let's rely on the free exercise clause in order to allow individuals to sort these claims in court. in some ways, arizona was the easiest case, she showed no evidence of religious discrimination against businesses. land of legal, gay rights organization told me today they had received almost 500 complaints over the past four years about lgbt discrimination in arizona. >> which is legal. >> it starts to feel like, you hurt my fist when i hit your face argument. but i think as we move to other states, that
interpretation of their own religion. and then to claim persecution. the vast majority of germans are christian and nobody is claiming that the schooling system is a way that deprives them of the way of practice it of christianity. so i think i understand technically why as a matter of asylum would be rejected. but, let's hope somebody will exercise discretion and let them in on other grounds. >> yeah. the decision really lies with the administration. >> exactly. >> that is it for the panel. we will watch this one. stay tuned for oscar-nominated films you may have missed. uture is a pretty difficult thing to do. but, manufacturing in the united states means advanced technology. we learned that technology allows us to be craft oriented. no one's losing their job. there's no beer robot that has suddenly chased them out. the technology is actually creating new jobs. siemens designed and built the right tools and resources to get the job done. millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn sym
the case in arizona, businesses to use religion as a defense in a private lawsuit. so to give you an example of how that might play out, you know, let's say you live in a state where it's illegal to fire someone because they're gay. now, if one of these bills passes, that company could turn around and say, oh, hey, i think homosexuality is a sin, therefore i'm going to fire you and i don't need to abide by this law. so, you know, that lawsuit provision is a big deal. >> i know in some of the cases, in some of the states where they've been considering this, the lawsuit provision works in such a way not only can you not sue somebody for discriminating against you, but if you do, you have to pay their legal fees as well as your own so it's almost a punishment for even complaining about being discriminated against. it's fascinating stuff and fast-moves story. dana lieblson, reporter for "mother jones." nice to see you. >> thanks for having any. >>> the federal prosecutor's investigation of the george washington bridge scandal in chris christie's new jersey has taken a turn today. we'v
-worth. not community or religion. it is looking in the mirror in the morning. i am with that type of money. >> is that the american psyche? >> it is, but it gets emotional when the government says, you are worth less and not worth this much. be prepared for pushback. >> is compensation on three or four or five years, do people hate that? >> people ate that. but the total compensation of the executive compensation package being tied to long-term performance so your personal compensation is tied to the overall success or failure of the company for whom you work. is with us on a busy morning. we will go to provo, utah, g oogle glass. what about google fiber? changing the way that you are wired. with markets on the move, this is "bloomberg surveillance." ♪ >> good morning, everyone. "bloomberg surveillance," i am tom keene with scarlet fu and adam johnson. we are little bit better than we were at 6 a.m. this morning. robert kaplan is with us and we will talk about leadership with him. we talk about what you are really meant to do. today, it was to tie the bowtie. , the kenneth feinberg secon
everybody else. we should treat everybody equally, no matter race, religion -- and so they would have been, i think, the state would the have been in trouble, because the super bowl was coming, and i'm sure other events was coming and people would have pulled out if that would have happened in arizona. i just don't like that either. >> magic johnson, thank you very much. great to be with you. >> you, too. >> see you on the final 25? >> i hope so. >>> we'll see if he's on the final 25. final concluding thoughts about magic, here to speak to the wpo, although not a member. his business interests go beyond those magic johnson theaters that you may be familiar with. he had lots of starbucks, which he ultimately sold back to howard and the starbucks company. his real estate interests, food service interests move far and wide. he has hotels in austin, hoboken and elsewhere and real estate holdings. magic the man, he is a huge, huge man, but what stands out about him is as big as he is, and he is big, he has an even bigger personality. and finally, there are two guys that i've met in my life who
religion, but as thomas jefferson was so shocked to find out, there is one religion that has a small component of it that believes that a sure way to paradise is to kill innocent men, women and children because they don't those religiously like radicals do. it's the reason thomas jefferson got his own copy of the koran that the library of congress still has. he wanted to see for himself. he was so well-read. he couldn't believe there was a religion that had a book, a holy book for a basis that would allow anyone to interpret it in such a way as to kill innocent men, women and children. there have been, to be sure, purported christians over the ages that thought it was their duty to go about and brutalize people who were not christians, but anyone who studies the teachings of christ about how we're to individually act knows those would not have been christians doing the kind of iolence that they did. it's not supported by the bible . what is supported in the bible is if you do evil, be afraid because god does not give the government to sort in vain. individually we're not supposed vi
's, this was caesar. this might have been freedom of religion on the part o of-- religious free done-- freedom on the part of this legislation but this came right down to arizona facing the same ignomiy and loss of capital that it faced on martin luther king day when it refused to accept martin luther king day as a national holiday and again lost convention business. i think it was a pretty tactical, hardheaded decision made. and mitt romney to his credit weighing in in favor of vetoing it. >> woodruff: along with arizona two senators it is not just arizona, but there are six other states considering similar legislation. >> well, i did declare my interest, hopefully we will see this resolve. what is interesting is the rea sortion of the corporate country club establishment that is what really rallied here and really changed the bill. this is an establishment that has been loss pog we are to the tea party, in part as my colleague gail pointed out because of the campaign-finance reform that made it hard for the big donors to control the party and made it easy for the tea party, but so this was a
of religion, clash of rights. here's how i answer dan. 50 years ago this day in one of surely the great legislative achievements in american history we passed the public accommodation section of the civil rights act saying if you open your doors to business in the united states you open it to everybody. that's a subtle issue. and the prestige of that law that just was obtained and i think that's where the mesh american people come down. it's a funny kind of sore winner in the gay rights movement that would say a photographer doesn't want to photograph my wedding. i have lots of other photographers i could go to. i'm going to use the hammer of government to force them to do this. it's not neighborly and it's not nice. the gay rights movement is winning. they should be, as i say, not sore winners. >> but having said that, i understand your point. you do say that if a gay couple wants to go into a bakery and have a wedding cake, the bakery should have to make cake. >> bake the cake. >> bake the cake. senator brown? you're thoughts on this? >> i thought what governor brewer did was appropri
versus gay right? >> free exercise of religion. the clash of rights. 50 years ago this year in one of the surely the great legislative freedoms of american history we passed the civil rights act. if you open your doors in the united states, you open it to everybody. that's the subtle issue. the procedure of that law has been obtain and i think that's where the american people come down. that said, it's a funny kind of sore winner in the gay rights movement that would say a photographer doesn't want to photograph my weddingin. but i've got lots of other photographers but i'm going to use the hammer of government to force them do this. it's not neighborly and it's not gay rights. they should be not sore winners. >> i understand that, having understood your point, you do say if a gay couple wants to go into a bakery and have a wedding cake, the bakery should have to bake the cake. >> bake the cake. >> senator brown, your thoughts on that? >> i thought it was appropriate for governor brewer to veto the law. there are both people on both sides of the very difficult issue. debt, spending
, what they want to do. either as an individual or a nation. the monotheistic religions of the world all push its members to fight against poverty. but right now the united states of america, the rich are getting richer, and the poor are getting what the rich don't take with them. >> congressman emanuel cleaver and sister simone campbell, i'm going to have to leave it there. thank you both for your time tonight. >> thank you, reverend. >> good to be here. >>> still ahead, a top democrat calls out republicans for their dependence on billionaire koch brothers. >>> but first, new surveillance video of a deadly shooting inside a walmart. one man is dead and the shooter has not been arrested. we'll talk about it next. covert ops? double agents? spy thriller? you don't know "aarp" thanks to the aarp tek program, this guy is spying on his new grandson. aarp tek gets people better connected to technology, to better connect with each other. with social media, digital devices and apps. if you don't think "hashtag love dad" when you think aarp, then you don't know "aarp" find more surprising possib
't okay. and she called him on it. >> do you have any idea, like, what religion i practice, what my political views are, what my views on social issues, things that matter? do you have any idea how i want to raise my kids? do you have any idea about any of that? >> i have no idea about any of that. >> and with that, she walked right off the show. but you haven't seen the last of her. she's reportedly set to be the next bachelorette. so for knowing her own worth and for showing women that in juan pablo's infamous words, it's okay, to stand up for ourselves, she's our disrupter of the week. >>> and coming up, a new trove of documents reveal the inner workings of the clinton administration and a new book details secretary of state hillary clinton's leadership style. so what more can we learn about hillary? that is coming up. starts with back pain... ...and a choice. take 4 advil in a day which is 2 aleve... ...for all day relief. "start your engines" new business owner, it would be one thing i've learned is my philosophy is real simple american express open forum is an on-line communit
to get rid ofr race, religion, tribalism and melt them all down through a powerful centralized your accuracy and make them into a new soviet man. it collapsed because when against human nature. the imperative of the human nature. when it collapsed under the weight of human nature, there was no explosion of tribe and religion that is always under the surface. you will never rid the world of tribalism and ethnic identity. the same thing is happening now in america. we slowly lose our liberty as we have to have a powerful keepalized bureaucracy to the growing ethnic tensions in line. that is what is happening here. host: do you think there's anything that should be done right now in the ukraine? caller: no. let them do what they are going to do anyway. one thing i'd do is i admire putin because he is a nationalist. the russian people are dying out. he stopped international adoption and months to rescue his children with them. he is encouraging that through different things. i admire the guy. i wish i would have a leader like that. from john calling in pennsylvania this morning. the sen
and ice of russia. bill: mike religioners is said putin is running circles around the united states. what do you expect him to do? >> well, i think the president needs to significantly change the u.s. policy. he is based the policy on russia when they feel more secure causes the world to feel more secure, actually what we're seeing the reverse. when russia feels more secure they tend to be more adventurese. that is certainly what we see playing out in the ukraine today. >> so what does our president do? >> well there's a couple of things the president can do. he one, can strengthen our ties with nato. he is exposed to expansion of nato that left ukraine, georgia, montenegro on hold. he could move forward with strengthening those ties. he could move to allow export of u.s. natural gas currently russia has a grip on europe where they are beholden to russia where they use it in the geopolitical leverage tool box. we can by entering into the opportunity to do that export and make a difference economically and have our al like some additional freedom. bill: there is a statement made by gentlem
of religion are in the first amendment to the united states constitution. >> yes, they are. >> when should they take a state? this law in arizona you have to prove as a businessman you were being burdened in your religious exercise. it didn't give the right of people to just say, i discriminated based on my faith. you had 11 republicans and democrats, harvard law professors and others saying this has been mischaracterized. >> you didn't need the law because there is no special protection. i want to move off that point to the point you just made. substantial burden to my faith. how is it a substantial burden to your faith to take photos of a gay wedding if you are a catholic? >> i think if people say, listen, i don't want to sanction polygamy or gay marriage or anything other than traditional marriage, we need to respect that. if you don't like it, shop around. it's not hard for gays to find somebody who is going to take a picture of them is there? >> how is it a substantial burden to your catholic faith to do that? where in your faith does it say that doing that is very wrong? >> you know
is going to cause discrimination based upon religion in arizona. i scoffed at that until tonight. when a muslim waiter serving up here walked up to sheriff joe, wouldn't give him his dinner because he says i don't serve slime. >> reporter: he was a supporter of the immigration law in 2010. he declined to speak with cnn said the statements i maid were satirical comedy. did this roast go too far? >> it was a roast. john kavanaugh is my friend. he's not a racist. there's a double standard around here. everybody is talking about him. what about the activists and these civil rights that call mena decide and hitler. why isn't there an uproar about calling me every name in the book. why are they worried about some roast? >> yes. all right. coming up next on "new day" -- it does matter when you tell jokes. coming up next on "new day" sure it's an honor being nominated but there are no losers on oscar night. wait until you see what the stars will be going home with in those gift bags. i got to go back to hollywood. >> i'm sure they will report them on their taxes. ♪ honestly? i wanted a smart
to kiev. historically the two peoples have been very close in terms of language and religion and culture. this can explain russian attitudes towards ukraine. but it's also true that putin has established a firm authoritarian regime in moscow, in russia. he doesn't like the fact that his fellow slavs are leaning towards democracy. he sees that as a challenge to his style of police rule. >> yeah. sir, it's been great having you on, mr. ambassador. really insightful and your long look at the past for ukraine has been so helpful to us. thank you. >> thank you. bye-bye. >> all right. a second life for blockbuster drug lipitor. up next, we're going to discuss pfizer's plan to sell an over the counter version of its popular cholesterol drug. getting it without a prescription. and the chances of overcoming concerns that consumers could safely take the drug without guide freance from doctors. >>> plus warren buffett telling cnbc he would buy today's downturn. why? because selling their funds makes them more money. which makes you wonder. isn't that a conflict? search "proprietary mutual funds". y
the world. >> father jonathan morris saw this movie. our fox news religion contributor. father, good to see you. what'd you think of it? >> well done! i live tweeted my experience of the film. i thought it was well done. it proves when you have the formula of great talent, and mark burnett and row ma downey are great talent, and production qualities, and secondly you have money put into it, and they did do that, and thirdly, you have faith-filled producers doing a film, it works. and ten years ago to the weekend, "the passion of the christ" came out. this came out -- this movie came out on friday, beat expectations. the industry had suggested maybe $7.2 million. it's now grossed $9.4 million on a friday. it's going to have a good weekend. it beat "the lego movie." and so -- >> hollywood has learned that the bible kind of sells. >> it does, as long as it's done, as i mentioned, that form la with the faith-filled producers and super good talent. you can't just put jesus on the screen and have him make money for you. >> it must be difficult to play jesus. >> no pressure, you know, of the chara
relationship with ukraine, good diplomatic and economic religions. >> john kerry, i assume he was, if he's in washington, he was at the white house for this so-called meeting. we saw general martin dempsey, chuck hagel, james clapper, where's kerry? >> he is, we don't know where he is right now, but clearly, he has a very close relationship with sergey la the russian foreign minister. you've seen some talk about the russians possibly calling their ambassador back to moscow, but that's not really where the business between the u.s. and russia is done. it's done between capitals, the white house, between the kremlin and secretary kerry and lavrov. secretary kerry has had some positive effects with his relationship with lavrov. they put together those peace talks in geneva. we have on the syrian crisis, we haven't seen a lot of progress, but they are determined to work together and this is i think you should look for kerry to get much more involved. >> we know the vice president, joe biden, has been deeply involved in this crisis as well. stand by. i want to go to moscow right now. fred is
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)